Bird Watching with Kids

Bird Watching with Kids – How to Get Them Interested

It’s good for children to have a hobby which gets them away from computer screens and games consoles and out into the fresh air. Come to that, it’s good for adults too and if it doubles as quality time with their children, so much the better. Bird watching with kids also benefits adults because they see birds, trees and the rest of nature with new eyes but how do you get kids interested in bird watching?

Some children need no encouragement to be interested in wildlife but most have to be persuaded in some way. First of all, if you only have one child, borrow another one; it will be more fun for your child and you can introduce an element of competition.

Before you start, it’s worth investing in some books about birds for kids; the photographs and illustrations may pique their interest. Make sure that they’re relevant to the area where you live so that you are actually likely to see some of them. Information about birds for children should be easy for them to understand and not go into too much technical detail

Get the children to make some bird feeding stations or if they’re old enough to handle hammer and nails, construct a couple of bird houses for your garden. While they work, tell them what they might end up seeing with plenty of descriptions; children particularly like colourful creatures so labour on the brighter looking birds in your area.

Once the bird houses or feeders are complete, place them in the garden and get the kids to keep quiet. A competition will focus their attention so offer a prize for who sees a robin or whatever first, then another bird and so on. Alternatively, offer a prize for the most different birds seen in the day.

Make the children feel grown-up by letting them use binoculars, a camera and a notebook.

Take the kids on a trip to the woods for a spot of bird watching with a carrot at the end of the trip like a visit to the bowling alley or their favourite burger joint.

Bird watching with kids has to be fun and rewarding or they will soon become bored, so don’t make it seem like a chore but a new and delightful world to explore.

Here are a couple of books about birds for kids which will help to get them interested:

About 

Liz is an amateur bird watcher who has been as far afield as India and South Africa combining bird watching with spotting wild animals.

Share

You can leave comments on this post but not trackbacks. Follow recent comments using this Comments Feed.